Water &Integrated Design Lecture and Workshop Series 

With local expert Art Ludwig
in Santa Barbara, California September 30th- November 21st 2014

Design for drought, fire, flood, climate; with lawn replacement, greywater reuse, rainwater and runoff harvesting, healthy transportation, and sustainability policy.

Check back for updated information

On this page:

 

Drought Policy Forum

Monday September 22nd, 1-3 pm
Franklin Neighborhood Center, 1136 Montecito St., Santa Barbara

Free

 


At this event Art Ludwig will briefly describe green infrastructure options for balancing Santa Barbara's water budget.

 

The hoped-for El Nino has been dissipating. The latest forecast is for continued below-average rainfall, far too little to end the drought. We have just experienced the three worst years of recorded rainfall ever. And current climate models suggest this drought is likely to continue for years.

What are our options? What will they take to implement? What are their costs? What are local water districts and their statewide and worldwide equivalents doing?

Building on the Drought Strategy Forum and Drought Action Forum, the Drought Policy Forum is for key stakeholders in the drought crisis. We will review the most up-to-date information about critical questions like those above. Then we will explore practical policy proposals to sustainably and cost-effectively adapt our community to the drought. Contact us with any proposals you would like to present.

Please join us and invite other stakeholders. Particularly important are water providers and policy makers; landscape, plumbing, construction, business, and real estate professionals; landscape suppliers and nurseries; and environmental advocates and educators.

For more information email Barbara Wishingrad at bwishingrad@gmail.com or call 805-403-4566.

 

info@sweetwatercollaborative.org

 

Sponsored by Sweetwater Collaborative.

 

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Sustainable Living Research Initiative Panel and Discussion

Thursday September 25th 2014
1:30 - 4pm
McCune Conference Room, UCSB Campus

 

The  Panel:          

Marc  Fisher,  Vice  Chancellor  of  Campus  Design  &  Facilities,  UCSB 
Bill  Kelley,  Chief  Building  Official,  Marin  County 
Art  Ludwig,  Ecological/Integrative  Design  Expert  &  Author,  Oasis  Design 
Carl  Palmer,  Sustainable  Land  Developer/Investor,  Legacy  Works 
Mark  Tollefson,  Executive  Director,  Fairview  Gardens,  Goleta     
Meg  West,  Planning  Commissioner,  City  of  Goleta 
 
Facilitated  by:   Ben  Werner,  Sama  Group 
     

Overview    
The  Sustainable  Living  Research  Initiative  (SLRI)  seeks  to  promote  innovation  in  building,  zoning,  and  health 
codes  in  order  to  support  sustainable  development  and  land  use  practices.  In  partnership  with  local  experts 
and  research/educational  institutions,  this  Initiative  aims  to  create  a  safe  means  to  regulate  and  oversee    
ladings  best  practices  in  sustainable  living  that  will  influence  the  next  generation  of  development.    
 
The  SLRI  is  intended  for  situations  where  the  following  factors  are  present: 
1) Property  owners,  designers,  or  researchers  interested  in  innovation 
2) Research/educational  institutions  and  local  experts  available  to  help  design,  test,  and  evaluate  projects 
3) Local  policy  makers  and  regulatory  agency  staff  interested  in  supporting  this  Initiative    
 
        This  question  will  be  the  focus  of  our  discussion: 
                      What  regulatory  framework  needs  to  be  in  place  to  support  this  Initiative?    
 
Context    
There  is  a  growing  sense  of  urgency.  We  need  to  create  options  for  development  and  land  use  that  actually 
improve  and  regenerate  the  ecosystems  that  support  us.  There  is  a  long  history  of  efforts  to  achieve  this  goal, 
including  green  rating  systems  and  codes  that  have  made  much  progress  on  many  pieces  of  the  puzzle.  The 
objective  of  the  SLRI  is  to  create  a  regulatory  framework  for  innovation  that:  1)  encompasses  the  entire 
permitting  landscape  (zoning,  public  health,  fire,  building,  etc.);  2)  allows  enough  flexibility  for  kindergartners 
integrated  systems  design  together  with  sufficient  oversight  to  ensure  that  public  safety  is  protected,  and  3) 
adheres  to  the  General  Plan  of  the  participating  municipality.    
    

We  look  forward  to  your  participation  in  this  strategy-shaping  discussion 


Invite (pdf)

More info (pdf)

Registration

Sponsored by Sama Group

 

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Integrated Design: the optimal, dynamic balance between all the relevant factors

 

Water Design for Drought, Fire, Flood, Climate, and More

Tuesday September 30th 2014
6 - 7:30 pm
Faulkner Gallery, Santa Barbara Public Library

$12 suggested donation

The first lecture in a series of talks and workshops this Fall, which explains integrated designs for super efficient fixtures, rainwater harvesting, water reuse, non-toxic, low carbon, fire-safe construction and more.

Integrating the solutions to these diverse issues is the key to revolutionary improvements the ecology, economy and sustainability of home, landscape and city. Drought resilience is just one of many benefits from considering all the relevant design factors at once.

This presentation will cover—

Target audience: Everyone (especially policy makers, agency staff, landscape architects, landscapers, architects, students and homeowners).


This talk will be technical but accessible. There will be something here for people at all levels of familiarity with these concepts.

Sponsored by Sweetwater collaborative, Santa Barbara Permaculture Network

Fireproof, low carbon wall of local adobe

 

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Greywater and Multifunctional Landscapes

Tuesday October 14th 2014
6 - 7:30 pm
Faulkner Gallery, Santa Barbara Public Library

Free

Homeowners—You’ve already paid for it, why not irrigate with washwater from your home?
Landscapers—there are thousands of hours of work to do to switch Santa Barbara homes over to green infrastructure.
Greywater can conserve thousands of gallons of water a month, save valuable plants during drought, and offers a host of other benefits. Learn about the benefits of a multifunctional landscape:

 

And more--

Target Audience: Landscape architects, architects, landscapers, plumbers and homeowners; there will be something for people at all levels of greywater familiarity.

Art Ludwig, the "greywater guru" is the author of the leading books and dvds on greywater.

 

Sponsored by City of Santa Barbara Water Conservation Program and the Sweetwater Collaborative

One day's harvest from an edible landscape that produces approximately 1000 lbs per year
of food on 1/8th acre with far less water than a lawn uses.

 

Helpful Preparation

Create an Oasis with Grey Water book cover.

The more of the background info below you understand (or have been exposed to) before coming, the more you will get out of the presenation.

The following is worth reading all the way through:

Resources mentioned in the talk

 

Sponsored by City of Santa Barbara Water Conservation Program and the Sweetwater Collaborative

 

 

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Laundry to Landscape greywater system schematic

Laundry to Landscape Installation Workshop

Friday October 17th 8:30 am til afternoon (subject to confirmation)

Geared towards professionals interested in installing greywater systems

Workshop logistics

Cost: TBA.

Registration: To register, please contact Madeline Ward at maward@santabarbaraca.gov, or call (805) 897-2672. Space is limited, register today! Priority will be given to landscape professionals, homeowners will be admitted on a space available basis. Please indicate with your registration if you are a landscape professional, and if so, your company affiliation.

Preparation: The Greywater Presentation will cover the backgound needed to make the most of the workshop, including water budgets, site plans, elevations. Attendence of the presenation is highly recommended; the material covered that evening will not be gone over again in the workshop. WatchingLaundry to Landscape (DVD)and readingCreate an Oasis with Grey Water (book)also helpful (for more prep see below).

Location: Residence in Santa Barbara. Exact address will be given with registration.

 


The workshop will consist of a mix of interactive discussion about the site, and hands-on demonstrations/work on the land. Wear work clothes and bring gloves and shovels.
Instruction will be in English, but Art has years of exposure to Spanish on projects in the US and Mexico and can provide clarification as needed in Spanish.

 

What the Workshop Will Explore

An entire Laundry to Landscape  system will be installed at a residence in Santa Barbara, from start to finish. This is the simplest, least expensive, lowest effort way to irrigate with residential greywater, and the most economically and ecologically viable to install professionally.

Other topics:

Helpful Preparation

Create an Oasis with Grey Water book cover.

The more of the background info below you understand (or have been exposed to) before coming, the more you will get out of the workshop.

The following is worth reading all the way through:

This stuff will add more depth if you can scan or read any of it:

If you are interested in policy, check out these pages:

Sponsored by City of Santa Barbara Water Conservation Program and the Sweetwater Collaborative

 

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The Joy of Lawn Replacement

Thursday October 30th 2014
7-8:30 pm

Faulkner Gallery, Santa Barbara Public Library

How you can save Santa Barbara and the world by replacing your lawn with natives and/or fruit trees. You can do so much better than grass, and with less water…

Free

Sponsored by SB Water Conservation, Sweetwater collaborative

 

See inspiring examples; learn how to do much better than grass with less water, time and money.


Lawn is one of Santa Barbara city’s biggest water uses. In the case of ornamental lawns, there’s especially little to show for all the money, maintenance, water and chemicals sunk into what is basically a landscape fashion from the last millennium.


Get ahead of the curve and learn how to improve—

See real life examples from audience members, and learn how to apply these principles to clients’ and your own yards.

For landscape architects, landscapers, architects, and homeowners.

 

Background reading

The Problem of Lawns

...Historically, lawns first became popular among the gentry of Western Europe, where they were managed either as pasture or by labor-intensive hand sheering or scything. The modern lawn seems to be a deprecated form of the highly manicured English landscape gardens which became popular among the nobility in Britain in the 17th and 18th centuries. But wasn’t until the 19th century with the invention and mass production of the lawnmower that lawns really took off in North America.

Today, American lawns occupy some 30-40 million acres of land. Lawnmowers to maintain them account for some 5 percent of the nation’s air pollution – probably more in urban areas. Each year more than 17 million gallons of fuel are spilled during the refilling of lawn and garden equipment—more than the oil that the Exxon Valdez spilled.

Homeowners spend billions of dollars and typically use 10 times the amount of pesticide and fertilizers per acre on their lawns as farmers do on crops; the majority of these chemicals are wasted due to inappropriate timing and application. These chemicals then runoff and become a major source of water pollution.Last but not least, 30 to 60 percent of urban fresh water is used on lawns. Most of this water is also wasted due to poor timing and application...

 

American Green: The Obsessive Quest for the Perfect Lawn

The often-crazed love affair between Americans and their lawns is Ted Steinberg's subject in "American Green." Mr. Steinberg, an environmental historian at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, likens this relationship, and the insane pursuit of lawn perfection, to obsessive-compulsive disorder, and he may very well be right. That would at least explain the behavior of a homeowner who clips her entire front yard with a pair of hand shears, or Richard Widmark's reaction on waking up in the hospital after a severe lawn mower accident in 1990. "The question I asked the doctors was not 'Will I ever act again?' " he later recalled, "but 'Will I ever mow again?' "

How did a plant species ill suited to the United States, and the patrician taste for a rolling expanse of green take root from the shores of the Atlantic to the desiccated terrain of Southern California? The short answer is that it didn't, not until after the Civil War.

 

Sponsored by City of Santa Barbara Water Conservation Program and the Sweetwater Collaborative

 

More before and after images...

 

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Sierra Water Reuse Conference

November 3-6 2014. Evergreen Lodge at Yosemite
       33160 Evergreen Road, Groveland, California

 

Check Sierrawatershedprogressive.com for coming details...

 

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Central Coast Sustainability Summit 

Thursday November 13th 2014, 8am – 4pm. Loma Pelona Conference Center, UCSB

This year’s themes:

Water
The Central Coast is experiencing an unprecedented drought, with the driest consecutive three years on record and current city water supplies severely reduced, water is on everyone’s mind. At this year’s summit, we hope to share best practices and build collaborations that will help address water shortage and quality issues on the Central Coast.

Energy
Energy and water are intimately intertwined, energy is used to secure, deliver, treat, and distribute water, while water is used to develop, process, and deliver energy. Climate Change acts as a stressor to already scarce water resources on the Central Coast. At this year’s conference we will explore the energy water nexus, best energy management practices, community choice aggregation (CCA), and renewable energy projects, with potential opportunities for collaborate that can the benefit of Santa Barbara County.

 

More information

 

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The wasteful path to scarcity. The site rapidly dehydrates itself by erosively draining rainwater and runoff away to flood downslope areas and contaminate surface water with sediment. Greywater is lost to the sewer. Costly municipal or well water is pumped in to replace the free water that was drained away. Leaf drop/mulch is also drained away further depleting fertility and water-holding capacity. This leads to a depletion of resources... © 2005 Brad Lancaster The stewardship path to abundance. This site passively hydrates itself by harvesting and infiltrating rainwater, runoff, and greywater on site, reducing downslope flooding and overall water consumption and contamination. The need to pump in water is greatly reduced or eliminated. Leaf drop/mulch is also harvested and cycled back into the soil and plants further increasing fertility and water-holding capacity. This leads to an enhancement of resources...

 

Rainwater Runoff Harvesting

Tuesday November 18th 2014 (subject to confirmation)

6-7:30 pm

Faulkner Gallery, Santa Barbara Public Library

Free

 

As much water falls from the sky within Santa Barbara city limits as the city consumes in a year. Infiltrating more of this water into the ground instead of letting it run off has a host of benefits:


This presentation will cover—

See real life examples, learn how to apply these principles to clients’ and your own yards.

For landscape architects, landscapers, architects, and homeowners.

 

 

Background reading

Sponsored by City of Santa Barbara Water Conservation Program and the Sweetwater Collaborative

This little curb cut and filter captures 100,000 gallons a year of "run on," which reduces
our irrigation season by two-three weeks on each end, and adds 90,000 gallons to groundwater.
It cost about $200 in materials and took two days; about 50x the return of a tank system.

 

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Rainwater and Runoff Harvesting Workshop

Friday November 21st 2014 8:30 am til afternoon(subject to confirmation)

Cost: TBA.

Registration: To register, please contact Madeline Ward at maward@santabarbaraca.gov, or call (805) 897-2672. Space is limited. Priority will be given to landscape professionals; homeowners will be admitted on a space available basis. Please indicate with your registration if you are a landscape professional, and if so, your company affiliation.

Preparation: Attendance of the Integrated Design and Rainwater Presentations is essential. Attending the Greywater and Lawn Replacement Presentations and readingRainwater Harvesting for Drylands (book)would also be helpful.

Location: Santa Barbara City. Exact address will be given with registration.

 

This workshop will cover—

 

Sponsored by City of Santa Barbara Water Conservation Program and the Sweetwater Collaborative

Stairs that double as channel to direct runoff to a 100,000 gallon cistern in Spain

 

 

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The Way of the Bicycle

Bici Centro, Santa Barbara. Date in December 2014 TBA

Bike pix and tales from 8 years travel in 27 countries on dozens of junk bikes; a million vertical feet of mountain biking on one of the first mountain bikes on the south coast; ten years of bike design innovation and making custom transport bikes for people without cars; 40 years of bicycling for transportation; expert testimony on the true cost of cars.
…With a focus on the keystone role bikes have to play for the regeneration of mental, physical, economic and ecological health for our community, and more:

 

Sponsored by Bici Centro

 

 

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More Info

 

More books, downloads and other information in our Catalog.

 

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www.oasisdesign.net • Copyright © Art Ludwig 1997 -2014